Monday, March 31, 2014

Another Trumbull Occupies the Capitol Building 164 Years Later

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For Immediate Release
                                                                                                                        March 31, 2014
                                                                                                                        Contact: Chris Zaccaro
                                                                                                                        (860) 246-1553 ext. 116
                                                                                                                        chris.zaccaro@cga.ct.gov

 

Another Trumbull Occupies the Capitol Building 164 Years Later

 
In 1850 the last Trumbull Family governor left what is now Connecticut’s Old State House. Today, 164 years later, another Trumbull has staked claim to the halls of what was one of Connecticut’s earliest capitol buildings. Connecticut’s Old State House is proud to announce that it has entered into an agreement with the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art to host five original paintings from world renowned Revolutionary War artist, John Trumbull. 

These famous works of art, seen in history textbooks for generations, include The Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776 (1832), The Death of General Warren at the Battle of Bunker’s Hill, June 17, 1775 (1834), The Death of General Montgomery in the Attack on Quebec, December 31, 1775 (1834), The Capture of the Hessians at Trenton, December 26, 1776 (1831) and The Death of General Mercer at the Battle of Princeton, January 3, 1777 (1831). Each painting depicts, in extraordinary detail, a moment during the American Revolutionary War; the conflict in which the original thirteen colonies rebelled against Great Britain and pronounced themselves an independent nation. Even without their impressive and detailed frames, the pieces each span nine feet long and measure six feet high.

 “These paintings bring new color and vibrancy to our Great Hall and Executive Branch chambers,” stated Sally Whipple, Executive Director of Connecticut’s Old State House. “When museums collaborate, good things happen. Trumbull’s works add a new dimension to Old State House stories about civic action, early political networks and the role of art, architecture and story in defining place. We are looking forward to sharing them with our visitors.”

"It is wonderful these grandiose paintings have found a temporary home at the Old State House, so visitors can continue to enjoy the magnificent depictions of a pivotal point in our nation’s history while the museum completes the final phase of its renovation,” said Susan L. Talbott, Director and C.E.O. of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art. “We as a museum family are delighted we only have to walk up the street to visit the paintings in the meantime.”

The artist, John Trumbull, was the son, brother and uncle of three Connecticut Governors. His father, Jonathan Trumbull Sr., was the first Governor of Connecticut, thus granting John extraordinary access to many of the Founding Fathers and leaders of the war effort. For this series of paintings, he drew upon actual events, some of which he witnessed. The series was originally planned to be fourteen scenes, however only eight were ever produced. In 1817, the United States Congress commissioned him to reproduce four of these paintings and today they hang in the Rotunda of the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. Former First Lady Abigail Adams, wife of the first Vice President and second President John Adams, was quoted as saying, “He is the first painter who had undertaken to immortalize by his pencil those great actions that gave birth to our nation. He teaches mankind that it is not rank nor titles, but character alone, which interests posterity.”

Trumbull later went on to recreate the series of paintings, but was only able to complete five before his death in 1843. The following year, these five paintings were purchased by Daniel Wadsworth for installment in the Wadsworth Atheneum.

Ironically, Trumbull’s cousin, a poet also named John Trumbull, oversaw the construction of Connecticut’s Old State House in 1796. He provided conclusive evidence that Charles Bulfinch was the building’s architect when he wrote a letter to Oliver Wolcott that read, “A new State House is to be built here next year upon a design of Mr. Bulfinch, which I think is worth executing in the best materials.” Trumbull’s brother, Jonathan Trumbull Jr., served as Governor from 1797-1809 and his nephew Joseph Trumbull began serving as Governor in 1849, six years after his death.

All five of the paintings are now available for public viewing through general admission. Special theme tours focused on the Trumbull paintings, an original Gilbert Stuart portrait of George Washington and other works of art in the Old State House will be available at Noon every other Thursday, starting April 3, 2014. You can visit www.ctoldstatehouse.org to view specific tour dates, which are available on the Old State House Calendar. Reservations for guided tours at other times can be arranged by calling (860) 522-6766.

Located in Hartford, a short walk from the Wadsworth Atheneum, Connecticut’s Old State House invites visitors of all ages to discover that their voices matter, and that words, ideas, persuasion and debate really can change minds – and, quite possibly, the world. The building served as a seat of government for the Constitution State from 1796 to 1878. For more information on admission prices, upcoming events and parking discounts nearby, become a fan of Connecticut’s Old State House on Facebook, follow us on Twitter or visit us online at www.ctoldstatehouse.org.
 
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Monday, March 24, 2014

Reflecting on Civil War Commemoration – How Remembering the Past Changes It: Old State House Conversation at Noon – Tues, April 8, 2014

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                                                                                                                                                                          For Immediate Release
                                                                                                                                                                          March 24, 2014
                                                                                                                                                                          Contact: Chris Zaccaro
                                                                                                                                                                          (860) 246-1553 ext. 116
                                                                                                                                                                          chris.zaccaro@cga.ct.gov

Reflecting on Civil War Commemoration –

How Remembering the Past Changes It

Old State House Conversation at Noon – Tues, April 8, 2014


Even 150 years later, no event in American history generates as much debate as the Civil War. How have perceptions of the war changed over time?  Do we view it differently than we did 50 years ago? Does our location change our perception? 

Join us to discover the answers to these questions and more as we host our featured speaker, Dr. Matthew Warshauer, during our next installment of Conversations at Connecticut’s Old State House on Tuesday, April 8th at 12 p.m.

Dr. Warshauer, Co-Chair of the Connecticut Civil War Commemoration Commission, a Professor of History at Central Connecticut State University and Editor of the recently published book Inside Connecticut and the Civil War: Essays on One State’s Struggle will be joined by two of the book’s authors, James E. Brown and Emily Gifford, for a panel discussion moderated by the Connecticut Network (CT-N)’s Diane Smith.

Brown, a corporate attorney and Civil War expert authored the chapter “Guns and Butter: How Connecticut Financed the War” and Gifford, an accomplished history, religion and social movement researcher and writer, authored the chapter “From Decoration Day to the Centennial Commission: Civil War Commemoration in Connecticut, 1868-1965.”

 Following this free event, Dr. Warshauer, Brown and Gifford will each be on hand for book signings. Copies of Inside Connecticut and the Civil War: Essays on One State’s Struggle will be available for purchase in the Old State House Gift Shop. Bring your lunch and enjoy the Conversation, which will last from noon to 1 p.m. Funding has been provided by Connecticut Humanities.

Located in Hartford just minutes from the Connecticut Science Center, Wadsworth Atheneum and the riverfront, Connecticut’s Old State House invites visitors of all ages to discover that their voices matter, and that words, ideas, persuasion and debate really can change minds – and, quite possibly, the world. The building served as the Constitution State’s original seat of government from 1796 to 1878. For more information on admission prices, upcoming events and parking discounts nearby, become a fan of Connecticut’s Old State House on Facebook, follow us on Twitter or visit us online at www.ctoldstatehouse.org.

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Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Pulitzer Prize winner Susan Campbell discusses her upcoming biography on Isabella Beecher Hooker: Old State House Conversation at Noon - Tues, March 25

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                                                                                                                                       For Immediate Release
                                                                                                                                       Contact: Chris Zaccaro
                                                                                                                                       (860) 246-1553, ext. 116
                                                                                                                                       chris.zaccaro@cga.ct.gov
 
Pulitzer Prize winner Susan Campbell discusses her upcoming biography on Isabella Beecher Hooker: Old State House Conversation at Noon - Tues, March 25
 
She wanted to rock the cradle and rule the world, yet most biographers wrote off Isabella Beecher Hooker as an eccentric who talked to the dead while yearning for a better world. On Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at Connecticut’s Old State House, discover the fascinating story of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s younger half-sister with Pulitzer Prize winning writer Susan Campbell, author of the upcoming book Tempest-Tossed: The Spirit of Isabella Beecher Hooker.

Following Ms. Campbell’s talk, join in a discussion about Isabella Beecher Hooker’s impact and the status of women’s rights today with CT-N’s Diane Smith, Shannon Burke, Director of Education of the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center, and Teresa Younger, Executive Director of the Permanent Commission on the Status of Women. Bring your lunch and enjoy this free program, which will last from noon to 1 p.m. This program is co-sponsored with the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center. Funding provided by Connecticut Humanities. 

A historic Connecticut figure who paved the way for women’s rights in the U.S., Isabella Beecher Hooker helped organize the National Woman Suffrage Association and fought for the passage of an 1877 Connecticut law that gave married women the same property rights as their husbands.

Located in Hartford just minutes from the Connecticut Science Center, Wadsworth Atheneum and the riverfront, Connecticut’s Old State House invites visitors of all ages to discover that their voices matter, and that words, ideas, persuasion and debate really can change minds – and, quite possibly, the world. The building served as the Constitution State’s original seat of government from 1796 to 1878. For more information on admission prices, upcoming events and parking discounts nearby, become a fan of Connecticut’s Old State House on Facebook, follow us on Twitter or visit us online at www.ctoldstatehouse.org.

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Hartford and the Modern Civil Rights Movement: Old State House Conversation at Noon – Tuesday, Feb. 25th

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For Immediate Release

                                                                                                                 February 12, 2014
                                                                                                                 Contact: William A. Bevacqua
                                                                                                                 (860) 246-1553, ext. 107
                                                                                                                 william.bevacqua@cga.ct.gov


 


Hartford and the Modern Civil Rights Movement: The Ties that Bind, 1943-1968
Old State House Conversation at Noon – Tuesday, Feb. 25th


 
Hartford, CT –History, when closely examined, is almost always more about evolution than revolution.  When contemplating the history of civil rights in the U.S., nearly everyone recognizes the stories of Rosa Parks,  Jim Crow lunch counters and the “Little Rock Nine” as shaping our national conversation on racism and equality.  But even as our collective attention was focused on the March on Washington and school integration by National Guard, Hartford and cities like it across the nation were busy making contributions of their own to the groundswell that ultimately defined the American Civil Rights movement.   On January 22, 2014, Connecticut’s Old State House will explore the story of how Connecticut’s capital city helped change the world in the modern civil rights era during its latest Conversations at Noon lunchtime program. 

The historic site of the Amistad captives’ trial provides an ideal backdrop for a fascinating look by Dr. Stacey Close of Eastern Connecticut State University at Black Hartford and the Modern Civil Rights Movement.   In the 1950’s and 60’s while Americans were sitting-in and marching, individuals like Rev. Dr. John Jackson and organizations such as the state’s Inter-Racial Commission, the NAACP, and the Black Panthers were stirring citizens in Hartford to fight for their rights.  Following Dr. Close’s talk, the Connecticut Network’s Diane Smith will moderate a discussion on how the movement changed the state, and on today’s continuing struggle for equal rights.   Close will be joined on the panel by Dr. Benjamin Foster, Jr., educator and author of When The People Speak: Selected Words on Life in the African American Experience, and Dr. Anne-Marie Adams, founder and editor of The Hartford Guardian and author of the upcoming book, The Origins of Sheff v. O'Neill: The Troubled Legacy of School Segregation in Connecticut. 

Program-goers are invited to bring lunch, join the conversation enjoy this free one-hour program, beginning at noon.   This program is co-sponsored with Connecticut Explored, the magazine of Connecticut history and funded by Connecticut Humanities.

 Located in Hartford just minutes from the Connecticut Science Center, Wadsworth Athenaeum and the riverfront, Connecticut’s Old State House invites visitors of all ages to discover that their voices matter, and that words, ideas, persuasion and debate really can change minds – and, quite possibly, the world.  The building served as the Constitution State’s original seat of government from 1796 to 1878. For more information on admission prices, upcoming events and parking discounts nearby, become a fan of Connecticut’s Old State House on Facebook, follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/CTOldStateHouse or visit us online at www.ctoldstatehouse.org.

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Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Rocking Robots, Invention Convention & Hands-On History: What do Students Learn from Academic Contests? Old State House Conversation at Noon – Tuesday, Feb. 4th

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For Immediate Release


January 21, 2014


Contact: William A. Bevacqua


(860) 246-1553, ext. 107


william.bevacqua@cga.ct.gov


 


Rocking Robots, Invention Convention & Hands-On History:


What do Students Learn from Academic Contests?


Old State House Conversation at Noon – Tuesday, Feb. 4th


 


Hartford, CT – Each year, thousands of Connecticut students participate in a vast array of academic contests that cover every major intellectual discipline.  Generations of participants would no doubt attest that such competitions are fun for those with an interest in the subject matter, but what lasting impact do these programs have on students, teachers and their classrooms? On Tuesday, February 4, 2014 students and educators representing three of the state’s top programs – History Day in Connecticut, CT Invention Convention, and CT FIRST – will explain how these contests have unleashed creative and inspiring ways to learn about subjects as diverse as the past, innovation and robotics in this latest installment of Conversations at Noon at Connecticut’s Old State House. 


 


Accompanied by a display of student projects, this fascinating program, moderated by the Connecticut Network’s Diane Smith, will explore how these programs and others like them supplement and support class work for students across the state in both home and traditional schools.  This month’s expert panel includes several award-winning students, representing schools in East Hartford, Hartford, and Southbury.  State Representative Gregory Haddad, board member of CT Invention Convention and History Day judge, will provide opening remarks. 


 


This free program lasts from noon-1 p.m. and is funded by Connecticut Humanities.


 


Over 4,000 students participate in History Day in Connecticut.  It is one of 56 affiliate programs of National History Day, a nationally recognized program that makes history come alive by engaging students in grades 6-12 in the discovery of the historic, cultural, and social experiences of the past. Students choose their topics based on an annual theme and after researching their topics, they present their findings in original papers, performances, documentaries, websites and exhibits. Students may work alone or as part of a group..  District competitions are held in March and winners are invited to participate in the State History Day contest in late April.  Students who place 1st or 2nd at the State Contest are invited to the national contest in College Park, MD.  For more information, check out http://ct.nhd.org.


 


The CT Invention Convention is a 31-year-old nonprofit organization whose mission is to foster interest in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) through school-based programs in invention, innovation and entrepreneurship.  Every year, more than 10,000 students in grades K-8 in more than half of CT's towns develop solutions to their everyday problems by coming up with an invention or an innovation.  They compete on the local level, and then finalists are invited to the University of Connecticut at Storrs for a day of judging and celebration of ingenuity. More than half of CIC's inventors are girls, and 17% are minority students. Some student inventors move forward with their inventions to patenting, manufacture and business formation.  For all students, the CT Invention Convention is a memorable learning experience in problem-solving and critical thinking.


FIRST was founded in 1989 by Dean Kamen to inspire young people’s interest and participation in science and technology. Based in Manchester, NH, the 501(c)(3) not-for-profit public charity designs accessible, innovative programs that motivate young people to pursue education and career opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math, while building self-confidence, knowledge, and life skills.  Dean Kamen is an inventor, entrepreneur, and tireless advocate for science and technology. His passion and determination to help young people discover the excitement and rewards of science and technology are the cornerstones of FIRST.  FIRST has been active in Connecticut since 1995. 


Located in Hartford just minutes from the Connecticut Science Center, Wadsworth Athenaeum and the riverfront, Connecticut’s Old State House invites visitors of all ages to discover that their voices matter, and that words, ideas, persuasion and debate really can change minds – and, quite possibly, the world.  The building served as the Constitution State’s original seat of government from 1796 to 1878. For more information on admission prices, upcoming events and parking discounts nearby, become a fan of Connecticut’s Old State House on Facebook, follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/CTOldStateHouse or visit us online at www.ctoldstatehouse.org.


 


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Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Out of the Shadows: An Old State House Community Conversation Airs Live on CT-N January 14th


For Immediate Release

January 8, 2014

Contact: William A. Bevacqua

(860) 246-1553, ext. 107

william.bevacqua@cga.ct.gov

 

Out of the Shadows:

An Old State House Community Conversation

Airs Live on CT-N January 14th

 

Hartford, CT – Each day, families all across Connecticut must cope with the challenges of mental illness.  One in four adults has a diagnosable – and treatable – mental disorder according to the National Institutes of Health, but many don’t seek the help they need due to fear, shame or ignorance.   

 

On January 14, 2014, CT-N’s Diane Smith will moderate an important conversation at Connecticut’s Old State House about Connecticut’s mental health: separating myth from fact and challenging the stigma surrounding a public health issue that will affect millions of Americans this year.   Starting at 7 p.m. Out of the Shadows: A Community Conversation About Mental Health, a live television event airing on CT-N, will focus on Connecticut’s young adults:  exploring personal stories, available resources, ideas and initiatives for making change.  

 

This frank, informative dialogue will include comments from Secretary of the State Denise Merrill, Commissioner of DMHAS Patricia Rehmer, Luis Perez , of the Mental Health Association of Connecticut,  State Senator Dante’ Bartolomeo (13th District), Frances Padilla from the Universal Health Care Foundation and Dr. Harold Schwartz from the Institute of Living.  Mental health professionals and ordinary people sharing their stories and struggles will also lend their voices to the conversation.   CT-N/Old State House Town Hall Meetings focus on providing useful information and inspiring Connecticut residents to take civic action that helps make their communities, their state and their nation a better place.  The series is inspired by insights gained from the Secretary of the State’s Civic Health Index, and is part of a vision to encourage meaningful conversations in a variety of arenas, ranging from organized civic gatherings to discussions around dinner tables.  Solutions to social and public policy problems can often be found when communities come together.

 

The program will air live on CT-N, webstream live at CT-N.com and will be available in the network’s On Demand library following the live event.  CT-N is available full-time on U-Verse channel 83 and on expanded basic cable statewide.  Visit ct-n.com to find the channel location for the network in your community or to watch online.  All Connecticut Network programming is closed captioned for the hearing impaired.

 

Out of the Shadows: A Community Conversation About Mental Health  is funded by Connecticut Humanities in partnership with Connecticut’s Old State House, the Connecticut Network, the Civic Health Advisory Group, the Secretary of the State's Office, Everyday Democracy, the Connecticut Commission on Children, and in support of statewide conversations growing out of the White House's recent National Conference on Mental Health. 

 

Located in Hartford just minutes from the Connecticut Science Center, Wadsworth Athenaeum and the riverfront, Connecticut’s Old State House invites visitors of all ages to discover that their voices matter, and that words, ideas, persuasion and debate really can change minds – and, quite possibly, the world.  The building served as the Constitution State’s original seat of government from 1796 to 1878. For more information on admission prices, upcoming events and parking discounts nearby, become a fan of Connecticut’s Old State House on Facebook, follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/CTOldStateHouse or visit us online at www.ctoldstatehouse.org.

 

Nominated for a 2012 Boston/New England Emmy Award, Winner of the national Sunshine Award from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Excellence in Journalism Award from the Connecticut Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, the Connecticut Network is the state’s source for complete and balanced television and webcast coverage of state government and public affairs.  For more information, become a fan of CT-N on Facebook, follow the network at www.twitter.com/CTNetworkTV or visit CT-N’s website at www.ct-n.com.

 

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Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Keep Calm and Hartford On: Busting Parking Myths Family-Feud Style. Wednesday November 20 6 - 8 pm



Parking in Hartford is a hot topic these days, and most people have plenty to say about it! HYPE’s Public Policy Committee and Connecticut’s Old State House invite you to Keep Calm and Hartford On, a Family Feud-style event where the differences between perception and reality in key parking issues and concerns in Downtown Hartford will be addressed.

Learn the real facts from the Hartford Parking Authority’s CEO Eric M. Boone and Associate Director Carey E. Redd, II, CAPP.  Well-known historian Bruce Clouette will provide historical context.  Doors open at 5:30 p.m.; the two hour program starts at 6 p.m. Enjoy complimentary hors d’ouerves and a cash bar (cash only, no cards) will be available. 

If you want your voice to be heard when our game-show host says “we asked 100 people” then please be sure to take the survey found through this link http://bit.ly/1bC4D7P.  Those who pre-register and check in the night of the event via www.events.hypehartford.com/reg will be entered into a drawing for a $50 Downtown Hartford Park, Shop & Dine gift card! 

Funding for the program provided by Connecticut Humanities.